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How to make shovelling snow less painful


Anyone who lives in Canada knows the pain associated with shovelling snow. From back pain to muscle aches, shovelling snow is not considered to be a fun experience.


Once the magical part of winter ends, here is how to keep the maintenance part safe for you.


ONE - LAYER IT UP

First layer

Wear a synthetic material against your skin to wick moisture away


Second layer

Should be insulating, such as fleece


Top layer

Should be wind resistant and waterproof


Wear two pairs of socks - with a wicking pair first, a hat, a face mask to warm the air you are breathing and finally a good pair of winter gloves.


TWO - START SLOWLY

Instead of stretching ahead of time, warm up by pushing and moving small shovels full of snow at a slower pace for a few minutes.


THREE - PROTECT YOUR BACK

Whenever possible push snow out of the way instead of lifting it. But if you can't then

- keep legs apart

- bend knees slightly

- keep back straight

- use legs to lift

- don't twist your body to toss the snow

- scoop small amounts of snow while keeping the shovel close to you.


FOUR - TAKE BREAKS

With deep or heavy snow - start from the top and slowly work your way to the bottom. Take regular breaks and stay hydrated.


Stop immediately if you are feeling unwell or experiencing signs of a heart attack (discomfort in the chest and other parts of the body, shortness of breath, breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea and lightheadedness).


Some other things to watch for could include dizziness and arm or jaw pain.

Signs of frostbite may be stinging, tingling and numbness.


FIVE - GIVE YOURSELF SOME TLC

You will feel post-shovelling pain within 24-48 hours after the workout.


Mild activity - like walking

Over-the-counter medication (if you have no underlying medical conditions that stop you from having it) should help.


SIX - PUT YOURSELF FIRST

If you have heart disease etc, then maybe consider hiring someone to help you with the activity.

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