Tropical development likely in the Atlantic Ocean soon


If the current model guidance is accurate, we will be seeing some action in the Atlantic Ocean soon.


The National Hurricane Center is monitoring three areas for potential development.


The first is a low pressure system that is located several hundred kilometres east of the Lesser Antilles. This feature is in an area where conditions are marginally conducive for development and as a result, a tropical depression is likely to form within the next couple of days.


Second is an area of low pressure that is located between the west coast of Africa and the Cabo Verde Islands. This lo has become better organized and some gradual development is possible over the next couple of days. This system will bring heavy rain to portions of the Cabo Verde Islands through Thursday.


A low has formed over the central subtropical Atlantic west-southwest of the westernmost Azores. Conditions are conducive for development, and a tropical or subtropical depression is likely to form during the next few days.


There is still a lot of Saharan dust over the Atlantic Ocean which is one reason for less development.


It has been a quiet year so far with only three storms. Neither of which became a hurricane. The last storm was Tropical Storm Colin, which dissipated on July 3 so there has been no named storm this month at all.


Activity is likely to pick up since the Atlantic Hurricane Season peaks around September 10.


The next named storm in the Atlantic will be Danielle. There are still three months left until the Atlantic Hurricane Season ends on November 30.